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2012 Ultralightweight Thunderbike?

Started by diamond, January 05, 2012, 07:54:12 AM

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roadracer162

Morten, Thunderbike is split into two classes. There is the Ultralight Thunderbike where it was intended for the 250 four stroke, and then opened up to include a couple more configurations. Then there is the traditional Thunderbike class where the once Heavyweight sportsman would run. The traditional Thunderbike class was opened up the to GP machines as did GT Lights and Lw F40 where the 250gp bike now runs. The GP chassis has been given an exemption from production base allowing them to be run. Doesn't matter if it is single cylinder.

Mark
Mark Tenn
CCS Ex #22
Mark Tenn Motorsports, Michelin tire guy in Florida.

Knedragon

Oh boy,Not another Oil Spewing diesel!!

Race125

Mark, I read the rule book. This is what I was referring to:
6.4 THUNDERBIKE - Thunderbike machines, except single cylinder machines, are
based upon production models, sold by manufacturers and their dealers in North
America for street use.

It had nothing to do with the exemption for single cylinder and 250GP machines

Morten

roadracer162

Mark Tenn
CCS Ex #22
Mark Tenn Motorsports, Michelin tire guy in Florida.

Gino230

Hey Steve,

Just curious, what kind of times do you run on your TZ250 at Homestead? Last few times I raced against you it was on your 125 (or diesel equivalent ;))

It seems crazy that LWThunderbike would allow GP chassis- I don't think that was the intent of the class- however times are tough and clubs need entries. Hence the reason we are going to Savannah vs. Daytona this March.

As for the 2stroke 250's, hey...... the more, the merrier! I just think if I have to race you in Thunderbike, you should have to deal with ME and my 749 in GT Lights and LWGP as well!
CCS / ASRA EX # 23
2012 Ducati 848 / 1100 Conversion     2005 Ducati 749RS
2006 CCS Florida Thunderbike Champion (AM)
2008 CCS LW Supersport National Champion (EX) 2nd in 2011 and now  2012....damn you Mavros!

Knedragon

Gino ..... RS250 here  :thumb: no Yamahas in my hands.On an average I'd say 1:32 .... if the stars line up 30's all day.Little bike its a crap shoot, I know I can do 35-36 just the pucker factor keeps holding me up so I see 37's and 38's  :kicknuts:
Oh boy,Not another Oil Spewing diesel!!

Gino230

Quote from: Knedragon on February 29, 2012, 08:54:23 AM
Gino ..... RS250 here  :thumb: no Yamahas in my hands.

Jeez how did I not know that?
CCS / ASRA EX # 23
2012 Ducati 848 / 1100 Conversion     2005 Ducati 749RS
2006 CCS Florida Thunderbike Champion (AM)
2008 CCS LW Supersport National Champion (EX) 2nd in 2011 and now  2012....damn you Mavros!

roadracer162

Mark Tenn
CCS Ex #22
Mark Tenn Motorsports, Michelin tire guy in Florida.

Knedragon

Oh boy,Not another Oil Spewing diesel!!

fzr400tony

#105
I'm probably talking a little bit out of school here, because I'm not a Ninja 250 guy.  But I love watching the class.  I even thought about buying one, but it seemed like you only really have one class to race. 

LRRS used to have a Production Twins class for the Penguin school EX500's (maybe they still do).  It was stock pipes and a bunch of other stock parts, keep the class CHEAP!!!  Since the 250's are always gridded with another class, why not have two classes for them ULTB and something like "250 production" with rules similar to the LRRS stuff that's gridded behind another class.  It seems to me like the best way to grow the class and fill up grids.

Not that I have any say in anything.  Just my $.02

HappySV

http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/811/12426/Motorcycle-Article/Backmarker--Racing-Inflation.aspx

GREAT read.  I honestly thought long and hard about trying this class, but when I saw it was going to be a builders class like some of the lightweight classes I wrote off the idea.  Food for thought CCS - even some of us old guys want a competitive cheap class for the lean times.

Brian
CCS 757 (backmarker expert)

Tri74x

Good read indeed. In all fairness, I think by year two those Seattle guys were getting busy with their engine builds anyway. AHRMA likes them because they can "bump" into 200GP, so logically you'd build your motor to 200cc (plus 60 thou over if you desired.) You'd be competivie in TWO races this way. The racing is awesome although the original spirit is gone. Still- I don't believe you'd need anywhere near the amount of money quoted in the article for an engine. Maybe if you outsourced everything and shipped every piece next day.... maybe. The good thing we have, where these guys did not- is a set of rules. Yes, not as tight as some wish, but hopefully can keep our "spirit" alive a bit longer than the norm.